Waste not, want not, win prize

posted February 23rd, 2009

greenroof Duke University Hospital’s commitment to go “green” in its 2007 heliport roof replacement project has won a national award for environmental stewardship and design excellence.

greenroofDuke University Hospital’s commitment to go “green” in its 2007 heliport roof replacement project has won a national award for environmental stewardship and design excellence.

The Washington, D.C.-based Center for Environmental Innovation in Roofing presented the award during the 2009 International Roofing Expo held Feb. 3-5 in Las Vegas.

“Duke Medicine is striving to be environmentally responsible in the construction and operation of our facilities,” says Robert Guerry, director of Medical Center Engineering and Operations. “We hope the positive outcome of the heliport roof sets the stage for further success, as we plan future hospital facilities.”

Center Executive Director Craig Silvertooth said the Duke Hospital roof project illustrates perfectly the intent of the center’s 2009 Excellence in Design awards program. “The environmental and economic benefit of forward-thinking roof design can be very significant, as demonstrated by the Duke Hospital project,” Silvertooth said.

The numerous “green” outcomes of the Duke Hospital helipad project included:

• 718 tons of solid construction waste diverted from the landfill (and $29,797 in landfill dumping fees were avoided).
• 430 tons of roof ballast stone recycled in Duke Forest for road stabilization.
• 2,120 miles of dump truck/landfill travel avoided (and 265 gallons of fuel spared), based on Waste Industries Inc. calculations.
• 289,000 board feet of insulation salvaged and preserved for future reuse; so far, four other Duke buildings have been re-roofed with the salvaged insulation.

The helipad project reflects Duke’s commitment to vision and leadership in environmental stewardship and sustainability (http://news.duke.edu/2009/02/sustainable.html), and to go beyond compliance in pursuing sustainability, stewardship and resource conservation.

Felix Markham of Medical Center Facilities Planning was the staff architect. Katherine Jordan was the LEED accredited professional with the Office of the Medical Center Architect. Tim Pennigar was Engineering & Operations project manager for the helipad roof.

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